mariko kusumoto sculpure

Mariko Kusumoto: the preciousness of textile art

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Mariko Kusumoto, an eclectic Japanese living in Massachusetts, has started her artistic life working with metal. She used to create complex, thus minute sceneries, using the heat to shape copper and bronze to her fantasy. Then she decided to experiment for her art something completely different, almost opposite.

Where strength was required to shape the metal masterpieces giving neat and unmistakable results, textile represents an innovative, light almost evanescent alternative: a new challenge.

Based on the antique Kanzashi tradition where the Japanese women use to arrange wonderful hairstyles, Kasumoto started to elaborate silk and acrylic yarns, transforming them in brilliant jewels, transparent cases of small wonders, kaleidoscopic landscapes of jellyfishes and sea anemones; true sculptures to be wearing and to make a dress precious.

Accessories and piece of arts, which seem to arise from the deepness of the oceans. Masterpieces in front of which arises a sense of childish wonder, as if the artist would have given shape to our most intimate dreams taken us into a world of levity were everything is possible.

We are fascinated by Mariko Kusumoto art, as it is pure emotion. It is the spreading wings of the creative process, even more magnified by the lightness of the material used. Silk, yarns and above all polyester that, robust thus delicate, it is perfect for the modelling process.

Fascinated by the beauty of nature and the Japanese culture, the artist affirms that she is inspired by anything that attracts her. Through her elaboration process, she donates a new evanescent life, being a seascape or a contemporary horror film.

Mariko Kusumoto works are placed in important public and private collections; her works have won many important awards such as the Niche Awards, The Grant, Massachusetts Cultural Council and the Juror’s Awards, Craft Forms 2015.

They are actually on exposition at the Mobilia Gallery – Cambridge.