Profumo - l’Opificio Interior Fragrance

l’Opificio Interior Fragrance: the uniqueness of a scent

l’Opificio and Tonatto Profumi, two torinese brands of excellence, join together for an exclusive perfume

Metaphor of excellence and liberty, only few things are able to touch the human soul and senses like a perfume. As a scent is exactly that: a subliminal language which overcomes any rule and rationality to address directly the emotional mind, evoking memories, dreams and emotions that are deeply rooted in each of us, that belong only to us and are grounded with our most inner matrix.

Though as nowadays the experience of beauty goes beyond any limit among different codex, l’Opificio is very proud to present Opificio Interior Fragrance, a scent exclusively designed by Tonatto Profumi, famous torinese maison, known all over the world to have create the fragrances for famous international jet set as Queen Elisabeth of England and Carolina di Monaco.

Famous for having given birth again to lost scents alike l’Acqua Siriana of the 1century a.C. or Cleopatra perfume-, which has been re-created thanks to the study of antique papyrus – in her Turin and Rome olfactory galleries, Tonatto, has combined modernity with tradition, conceiving an experience that allows to overcome specific artistic forms.

The choice of a well renowned laboratory, which has the same care for the scent as l’Opificio for its textile creations, has allowed to create a fragrance which interprets at best the wonderful feeling of a perfect textile, the endearing magic of a beautiful velvet, of a dear memory or a special unique moment.

The result of the collaboration of Paola and Barbara Bertoldo with Daniela Tonatto is l’ Opificio Interior Fragrance, a versatile fragrance based on exclusive and precious natural essence, that can be used directly on the textiles, as it respect their preciousness, and also be worn daily on the skin.

Opificio Interior Fragrance is proposed in two versions – shanghai and spray – 200 and 250ml. It has a warm thus reassuring persistent aroma, a contemporary interpretation though timeless.

mariko kusumoto sculpure

Mariko Kusumoto: the preciousness of textile art

Mariko Kusumoto, an eclectic Japanese living in Massachusetts, has started her artistic life working with metal. She used to create complex, thus minute sceneries, using the heat to shape copper and bronze to her fantasy. Then she decided to experiment for her art something completely different, almost opposite.

Where strength was required to shape the metal masterpieces giving neat and unmistakable results, textile represents an innovative, light almost evanescent alternative: a new challenge.

Based on the antique Kanzashi tradition where the Japanese women use to arrange wonderful hairstyles, Kasumoto started to elaborate silk and acrylic yarns, transforming them in brilliant jewels, transparent cases of small wonders, kaleidoscopic landscapes of jellyfishes and sea anemones; true sculptures to be wearing and to make a dress precious.

Accessories and piece of arts, which seem to arise from the deepness of the oceans. Masterpieces in front of which arises a sense of childish wonder, as if the artist would have given shape to our most intimate dreams taken us into a world of levity were everything is possible.

We are fascinated by Mariko Kusumoto art, as it is pure emotion. It is the spreading wings of the creative process, even more magnified by the lightness of the material used. Silk, yarns and above all polyester that, robust thus delicate, it is perfect for the modelling process.

Fascinated by the beauty of nature and the Japanese culture, the artist affirms that she is inspired by anything that attracts her. Through her elaboration process, she donates a new evanescent life, being a seascape or a contemporary horror film.

Mariko Kusumoto works are placed in important public and private collections; her works have won many important awards such as the Niche Awards, The Grant, Massachusetts Cultural Council and the Juror’s Awards, Craft Forms 2015.

They are actually on exposition at the Mobilia Gallery – Cambridge.